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Scientia Professor Andrew Dzurak

Director, ANFF-NSW
Australian National Fabrication Facility,The University of New South Wales
&
Chief Investigator, ARC Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computation & Communication Technology



Biography:

Andrew Dzurak is one of world's leading experts in quantum computing.  He is a Scientia Professor at UNSW-Australia, and is Director of ANFF-NSW (http://www.anff-nsw.org), the NSW node of the Australian National Fabrication Facility. Following a PhD in Cambridge in 1993, Andrew was central to the establishment of the Australian Centre for Quantum Computer Technology, which now maintains the world's largest focused collaboration on silicon-based quantum computing. Andrew, with colleague Andrea Morello, demonstrated the world's first silicon quantum bits (qubits) in 2012, and more recently developed a new qubit technology by reconfiguring the ubiquitous CMOS transistors that make up all of today's silicon processor chips. He leads a team at UNSW focused on the development of a quantum processor that can be manufactured using CMOS technology which is funded by the US Army Research Office, the Australian Research Council, and the company Silicon Quantum Computing Pty Ltd. He has published well over 100 scientific papers including 12 papers in the prestigious Science and Nature group journals, and is co-inventor on 11 patent families. Andrew received the 2011 Australian Eureka Prize for Scientific Research, and his silicon qubit work was selected by Physics World, UK as one of the world's Top Ten Scientific Breakthroughs for 2015.

Abstract:

Silicon-based quantum computing: The path from the laboratory to industrial manufacture

In this talk I will give an overview of the development of silicon-based quantum computing (QC), from the basic science through to its prospects for industrial-scale commercialization based on CMOS manufacturing. I will begin with Kane's original proposal [1] for a silicon quantum computer, conceived at UNSW in 1998, based on single donor atoms in silicon, and will review the first demonstrations of such qubits, using both electron spins [2,3] and nuclear spins [4]. I will then discuss the development of SiMOS quantum dot qubits, including the demonstration of single-electron occupancy [5], high-fidelity single-qubit gates [6], and the first demonstration of a two-qubit logic gate in silicon [7]. Next, I explore the technical issues related to scaling a silicon-CMOS based quantum processor [8] up to the millions of qubits that will be required for fault-tolerant QC. Finally, I will discuss the broader effort in quantum information in Australia and a new company – Silicon Quantum Computing P/L – which has been established this year to commercialize Australian research in this field.

 

[1] B. E. Kane, Nature 393, 133 (1998).

[2] A. Morello et al., Nature 467, 687 (2010).

[3] J.J. Pla et al., Nature 489, 541 (2012).

[4] J.J. Pla et al., Nature 496, 334 (2013).

[5] C.H. Yang et al., Nature Comm. 4, 2069 (2013).

[6] M. Veldhorst et al., Nature Nanotechnology 9, 981 (2014).

[7] M. Veldhorst et al., Nature 526, 410 (2015).

[8] M. Veldhorst et al., arXiv:1609.09700, to appear in Nature Comm.

 

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Director, ANFF-NSW Australian National Fabrication Facility,The University of New South Wales & Chief Investigator, ARC Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computation & Communication Technology
Expertise : Expert in quantum computing